Pete Seeger & the Power of Song

On January 29, MD and members of the Old Town School Folk Chorus performed “A Tribure to Pete Seeger” at Convenant Village Retirement Community, Northbrook IL. The one-hour concert was broadcast on local access televsion throughout the Covenant Village campus.

Click here or on the image of Pete to download the audio.

Dvorak who played guitar, 5-string banjo and 12-string guitar, was joined by Ronna Baron, Michelle Billingsley, Samantha Kyrkostas, Larry Lindeman, Carolyn Meadows, Jim Picard, Daniel Pierce, Mary Schons, Suzanne Strom and Marge Weber.

pete.1

Perhaps no single person of the 20th century has done more to preserve, broadcast and redistribute folk music than Pete Seeger. His passion for politics, the environment and humanity earned him both ardent fans and vocal enemies since he first began performing in the 1930s.

In 1948 he formed the folk singing group, The Weavers, which scored massive hit records with “Tzena, Tzena, Tzena,” Lead Belly’s “Irene Goodnight” and “On Top of Old Smoky,” before losing their recording contract and bookings during the Communist witch hunts of the 1950s.

Seeger was a major force at the Newport Folk Festivals and a promoter of upcoming talent. His marathon-length concerts included Spanish songs, African songs, African-American work songs and spirituals, new protest songs and old folk songs, sometimes with rewritten lyrics. And he got everyone singing along, often in multi-part harmony.

Seeger’s own songs became hits for others; “If I Had a Hammer” for Trini Lopez and Peter, Paul and Mary; “Turn, Turn Turn,” for The Byrds; and “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” for the Kingston Trio. He was also known for his versions of “Little Boxes” by Malvina Reynolds, and “We Shall Overcome.”

In 1969, Seeger launched the Sloop Clearwater and formed a group to help clean up the Hudson River in New York. He maintained a busy appearance schedule into his octogenarian years, much of it given over to benefits for a variety of causes.

Pete Seeger passed away in New York City on January 27, 2014.

MORE

q Stay in touch • info@markdvorak.com • PO Box 181 • Brookfield IL 60513 • 312 315 4273